post-luxury




bachelor thesis
2017 





















The thesis deals with questions of luxury furniture in the 21st century, while trying to set new paradigms for a field of design that has, in the last 30 years, collapsed into itself. The products are made out of epoxy resin and reclaimed wood, materials not typical of luxury design, used together on the basis of analyzing the user experience with different types of furniture. The findings are used to determine the surface requirements of individual elements of objects, which dictate the final form and the way materials are combined.

The products that are a part of the thesis are made to be used long term, made possible by the seemingly indestructible nature of resin. It is a constant in the life cycle of the product and acts as a base upon which wooden, fragile parts are added and easily replaced in case of breaking. The untreated and unprotected wood welcomes all deformations, be it cuts or bruises, the consequence of long term use, written on the surface as a story. Consequently, dislocated in time and liberated from the context of their creations, the objects don’t lose value. Rather, by evolving their appearance, they morph from objects of utility, addressing everyday needs, into objects of sentiment, being handed down from generation to generation.

The thesis seeks value in the intangible aspects of design, such as time, and sets a mirror to antiquated ideologies of luxury design.















Mark